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TeMerc
Releases Risk Modeling Document; Announces Public Meeting

QUOTE
Washington, D.C.- The Anti-Spyware Coalition (ASC), an alliance of technology companies and public interest groups, today announced several key accomplishments in its ongoing effort to help users combat the unwanted and often dangerous spyware infesting their computers.

As both Cyber-Security and Domestic Violence Awareness Month draws to a close,  ASC today unveiled its final, consensus definition of spyware, which was developed by coalition members including major anti-spyware companies, software developers and public interest groups. The definitions were further shaped by almost 400 comments submitted by organizations and individuals to the ASC Web site (http://www.antispywarecoalition.org). The final document, available now on the ASC Web site, will serve as the foundation for all of the coalition's future anti-spyware efforts.


Pres Release

Anti-Spyware Coalition Risk Model Description

QUOTE
The anti-spyware industry offers a robust selection of tools to consumers in the marketplace. As is to be expected in such an environment, the rating systems used to classify Spyware and other Potentially Unwanted Technologies vary between Anti-Spyware vendors. The members of ASC believe that reputable anti-spyware companies should be transparent about their decisions to help users understand how anti-spyware tools make decisions; software publishers understand what may concern users; and Anti-Spyware vendors share information about emerging threats.

To facilitate that transparency, the ASC has developed a list of a broad set of behaviors that its members can use to help users make decisions. We expect the list to change over time as new bad practices are discovered.


Anti-Spyware Coalition Risk Model Description

Anti-Spyware Coalition Definitions and Supporting Documents

QUOTE
Spyware has quickly evolved from an online nuisance to one of the most dire threats facing the Internet. As users struggle to maintain control over their computers, many find themselves trapped in a cyclical battle against programs that install themselves without warning, open dangerous security holes and reinstall themselves after they've been deleted. The worst of these programs allow online criminals to hijack users' sensitive personal information at will. Even the most benign variants can slow computers to a crawl by wasting their processing power to provide unwanted "services." Compounding the problem are the sophisticated ploys spyware developers use to install their programs on unsuspecting users' computers. Spyware distributors often rely on security holes, clever cons, opaque "bundling" arrangements and other unsavory practices to spread their unwanted payload. As the threat has grown, so has the need to mount a coordinated defense against these unwanted programs and their adverse effects
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Anti-Spyware Coalition Definitions and Supporting Documents
firstaid
Is is just me or is that to vague?

Where does authorizing third party software come into this? Who is gonna be responsible for this?

and the we told you so defense? We need clear / easy popups telling people that this kinda thing is gonna happen if they install something. Not no damn mile long agreement that no one knows, but a link to the section in the argreement that stipulates this type of thing on the install.

You can not classify these things unless you first classify and set a standard for these type of apps to start out with, in the install process.


well, thats my first thought on this type of thing.

firstaid
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